IMAGINATION — ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE

Think about all the memories of past events in your life. Those memories help you deal with your problems in the present.

Project these memories into the future, with neurons firing in fuzzy patterns, and you have imagination. Imagination is rearranging knowledge and memories of the past to create new ideas.

Merriam-Webster Definition of Imagination

  • the act or power of forming a mental image of something not present to the senses or never before wholly perceived in reality
  • a : creative ability
  • b : ability to confront and deal with a problem : resourcefulness — use your imagination and get us out of here
  • c : the thinking or active mind : interest — stories that fired the imagination
  • a : a creation of the mind; especially : an idealized or poetic creation
  • b : fanciful or empty assumption

Because I was weak in recall, sequencing and reading, my imagination became a very strong muscle. When I was 12, stuffed animals still held some joy because I could project personalities onto them. There were real to me.”

Stephen J. Cannell, Emmy award-winning screen-writer.

THINK LIKE A DYSLEXIC

Dyslexics may see many more creative possibilities in the same information available to anyone.

When people say “think outside the box,” they are really saying “think like a dyslexic.”

Jack Horner, Paleontologist

THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX TO PUT SOMETHING INSIDE THE BOX

When Ingvar Kamprad, founder of IKEA Furniture, was just starting out in business, he overheard a designer complaining about how expensive it was to ship bulky furniture. Kamprad’s solution was to sell the furniture in a flat box, and let the buyer put it together. This technique had been tried for years, with limited success. What made it work for IKEA was that the pieces were designed to go together easily, and the simple instructions showed excactly how to put the furniture together, without using any words!

Creativity is the key for any child with dyslexia — or for anyone, for that matter. Then you can think outside of the box. Teach them anything is attainable. Let them run with what you see is whatever they need to run with.

Orlando Bloom, star of Lord of the Rings, Pirates of the Caribbean and Blackhawk Down
Relativity by M.C. Escher

We don’t know if M.C. Escher was dyslexic. But he had a dyslexic trait — he was able to rotate and twist images in his mind to create fantastic scenes. He is now one of the most recognizable artists in the world.

STANDARDIZED TESTS DON’T TEST FOR CREATIVITY

Of course, seeing new connections may cost you speed and accuracy. That can be a problem. For example, to do well on standardized tests, you need to be fast and accurate with facts (left brain stuff), not spinning off new insights between ideas (right brain stuff), no matter how brilliant the ideas are.

But you are being tested on how well you memorize facts or plug in numbers, not where your knowledge can take you. Sure, you need to know lots of the stuff you are being tested on. But brilliant new ideas don’t come out of standardized tests. They come out of creativity.

REFERENCES

Attebery, Liz. “Jack Horner, Paleontologist.” The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity. 2016. http://dyslexia.yale.edu/horner.html.

Eide, Brock, and Fernette Eide. The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain. New York: Hudson Street Press, 2011.

Neal, Meghan. 2010. “Dyslexia’s Special Club: Actor Orlando Bloom Speaks Out.” The Huffington Post. June 9, 2010. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/06/09/dyslexias-special-club-ac_n_602380.html.

People.Com. 1995. “Picks and Pans Review: Talking With… Stephen J. Cannell,” June 5, 1995. http://www.people.com/people/archive/article/0,,20100782,00.html.

Shaywitz, Sally E. Overcoming Dyslexia: A New and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level. 1st ed. New York: Knopf, 2003. (This book has recently been released as an updated second edition.)

Stringer, Chris. 2012. Lone Survivors: How We Came to Be the Only Humans on Earth. 1st U.S. ed. New York: Times Books/Henry Holt and Co.

The Power Of Dyslexia. n.d. “IKEA Founder Ingvar Kamprad Struggles With Dyslexia.” Accessed August 25, 2016. http://thepowerofdyslexia.com/ikea-founder-ingvar-kamprad/.

Wolf, Maryanne. 2007. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. 1st ed. New York, N.Y.: Harper.

CREATIVITY: INSIGHTS

INSIGHT— THE AHA! PROCESS

Insights are “Aha!” moments, when you suddenly see the answer to a problem.

The insight process takes all the small bits of information your brain has gathered, looks at them without ruling anything out, and connects them together in a unique way to solve a problem. Insight is how you generate brilliant new ideas.

Insight is an understanding of relationships that sheds light on or helps solve a problem.

Dictionary.com

WHO HAS INSIGHTS?

Anybody can have insights.

But because they happen in the big-picture right side of the brain — in an area dyslexics use more than fluent readers — you may be especially good at them.

Why?

The orange area in the right hemisphere is where we have flashes of insight. The insight is that bats hang upside down easier than girls do because they have less blood to flow to their heads.

Everybody uses an area in the big-picture right hemisphere to have insights.

Fluent readers use areas on the left side of the brain to store the meaning of a word. This means we don’t use the right sides of our brains as much.

Fluent readers store words on the left hemisphere.

Dyslexic readers use the right side of your brain more.

Dyslexic reader realizing that bats can hang upside down longer than girls because they have less blood rushing to their heads. Dyslexics may have more insights because they use the right side more.

Because your brains are used to working on the right side as well as the left, those paths work well. Plus, when one area is stimulated, other areas around it are stimulated, too!

JOKES BASED ON INSIGHTS

One place you see insights a lot are in jokes.

How do you get a square root?
Put a tree in a square pot. – Jay Leno

“Where do you want this big roll of bubble wrap?” I asked my boss.
“Just pop it in the corner,” he said.
It took me three hours.

If at first you don’t succeed, don’t try skydiving. – Jay Leno

If can be clergymen defrocked, doesn’t it follow that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys deranged, models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?

INSIGHT PROCESS

Insights leap over a lot of in-between stuff instead of going step by step. Because of that, it’s hard to explain exactly how the insight thought process works.

But lately, researchers have begun to recognize the steps in the insight process:

Left BrainRight Brain
1. You focus your mind on the problem, studying it and gathering facts, trying to put the pieces together logically





2.You put the problem down, and stop trying to solve it. Your mind relaxes, stills, and begins to wander.
3. Your mind begins to put ideas together in a new and creative way. It rotates the problem and compares it to other information that you’ve absorbed from all sources.
When an interesting connection is made,cells all over the brain light up. “Eureka!”

The insight process takes all the information you’ve learned from family, friends, school, TV, books – wherever – and sees what might work. It doesn’t rule out any combination of ideas as wrong or too strange. Anything is possible.

Flashes of insight happen when your mind is still or bored — you’re in the shower, waking up or drifting off to sleep, riding in the car, walking the dog. It’s not so good if your mind wanders when you’re supposed to be paying attention in class, but it happens. The point is that relaxation is important – you can’t hurry or force insight. In fact, concentrating hard slows mental creativity and uses up brain energy.

But insights are where great discoveries come from!

Archimedes had his “Eureka!” moment figuring out that the same volume of water as his body moved out of the way when he sat in his bath; Isaac Newton when he realized that there was something pulling down on everything, all the time, everywhere, while sitting under a tree watching fruit fall; yours might have been when you realized that if you tip the couch on its end, it will fit through the door. We all have these brilliant moments when the world shifts, and we see a new way forward. But dyselxics may have more of them.

DAYDREAMING OR NEW IDEAS? YOU BE THE JUDGE.

Because it happens when the brain is relatively still, the insight process looks like daydreaming. But it produces awesome new ideas.

INSIGHTS ON INSIGHTS

Still, there are some problems with insights.

● It takes time to build up enough knowledge to have insights. This is why you go to school — to gain knowledge to draw on.
● Working out all these relationships between bits of knowledge to produce insights starts as a slow and fuzzy process.
● You can’t control when the insights will come.
● Insights might never come at all.
● Insights could be brilliant, but still be wrong.
But once the insight process gets going, insights gallop along instead of walking. Insights often come faster than others can keep up.

REFERENCES

Beilock, Sian. Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal about Getting It Right When You Have To. 1st Free Press hardcover ed. New York: Free Press, 2010.

Eide, Brock, and Fernette Eide. The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain. New York: Hudson Street Press, 2011.

Kounios, John, and Mark Beeman. “The Aha! Moment: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Insight.” Current Directions in Psychological Science 18, no. 4 (August 1, 2009): 210–16. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8721.2009.01638.x.

———. The Eureka Factor: Aha Moments, Creative Insight, and the Brain. First edition. New York: Random House, 2015.

Taylor, Jill Bolte. My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist’s Personal Journey. First edition. New York: Penguin Books, 2016.

Wolf, Maryanne. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. 1st ed. New York, N.Y: Harper, 2007.

Zimmer, Carl. “You’re a Dim Bulb (And I Mean That in the Best Possible Way).” The Loom. DISCOVER Magazine, March 23, 2006.

CREATIVITY: PATTERN RECOGNITION — SEEING WHAT OTHERS DON’T

           Because dyslexics use your creative right brains more, that side gets very strong. This strength may let you soak up patterns of things that you see, and processes that you imagine.  Dyslexics link ideas together in different ways — instead of following a “logical” step-by-step sequence, you might see a pattern or similarities and likenesses.

            Learning foreign languages is usually hard for dyslexics. But Richard Engel picked up four different dialects of Arabic, as well as Spanish and Italian, as he worked as an international television journalist. He did it by finding patterns in the languages.

“If you can stand to listen to the chaos long enough you can start picking out the notes and soon you have a symphony.”

Richard Engel, Author and Television Journalist

Pattern recognition

What do these words have in common: Madam, civic, eye, level?
To find the answer, read each one backwards.

When my dyslexic husband was getting a new phone number for us, the phone company offered him three different numbers to choose from. My husband immediately said “We want 418-0936”. When I asked him why, he said “Because it’ll be easy to remember. With the exception of the first number, all the pairs of numbers add up to 9.” Maybe easy for him to remember — I had to just memorize it.

(Note: I’ve changed the actual phone number. You’ll have to go through all the possible combinations of 9 to call me.)

Patterns show up in numbers, too: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13… What comes next in this pattern of numbers?

Answer: 21.

The pattern is made by adding the first two numbers together to get the next: 0+1=1, 1+1=2, 1+2=3, 3+ 2=5…

This sequence of numbers is very common in nature and architecture. It even has a name — the Fibonacci sequence.

References

“10 Riddles That Play on Words.” n.d. Kidspot. Accessed November 9, 2017. http://kidspot.com.au/things-to-do/activity-articles/10-riddles-that-play-on-words/news-story/38308fcc7c41a224ade5d3d99da64ac4.

Eide, Brock, and Fernette Eide. 2011. The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain. New York: Hudson Street Press.

Grandin, Temple, and Catherine Johnson. 2005. Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior. New York: Scribner.

Wallace, Jane. “Richard Engel, Chief Foreign Correspondent for NBC News.” Yale Dyslexia. Accessed October 8, 2020. http://dyslexia.yale.edu/story/richard-engel/.

Wolf, Maryanne. 2007. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. 1st ed. New York, N.Y.: Harper.

CREATIVITY: GIST — THE MAIN POINT

The gist is the kernel of an idea. Dyslexics get the gist of the idea easier than many people — you see what’s important, then discard the rest,  leaving everybody else to wonder “Why didn’t I think of that?”  Linear thinkers and fluent readers may see the same information, but it is often locked into scripts or apps in their brains — they may not realize that they can use the knowledge in a new way. Or they get lost in the details, and have a hard time seeing what’s important.

The gist of an idea is its main point or part.

Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary

For example, what is the gist of this entire website? That dyslexics are different, not less than.

If you are good at cutting to the heart of the matter, seeing the point, it will help you in school, and later in life.

Rube Goldberg drew cartoons of everyday actions that became ridiculously complicated.

Seeing the gist of something seems so obvious and easy that it is a little ambitious to call it a “skill”. But some people see the point much easier than others. Those who don’t flounder, mired in extraneous details and useless actions.

Here’s an example:

I used to have a boss who called me into his office and gave me long detailed instructions on how I was supposed to gather information for a report. The first time he did it, I sat there and listened to him going on and on about what data to look at and what I should avoid, where to find it, ignore the data in this column, here’s the latest picture of the kids, he likes to use the yellow highlighters, but I might find these numbers interesting, had I heard that this project was on hold? But he was going to go out and fix it, so don’t worry about it …

A solid five minutes of … stuff. Somewhere in that avalanche of words was what I was supposed to do.

I had just started the job, and was terrified of not doing well. But I was totally lost.

I thought about some of the words that had washed by me, and what this boss would need to know from that data. I gathered up my courage and said “You want me to find the data on these projects. I’m to highlight these numbers, and put the pages in the gray binders on that desk. If I have any questions, I’ll ask.”

My boss looked at me like I was dense. “That’s what I just said.”

But what took him five minutes to say, I did in 30 seconds.

Gist doesn’t seem like much at first, but people who see the world differently are often able to cut to the point of a topic and ignore all the extra “stuff”.

And that can be a huge advantage.

“Being dyslexic can actually help in the outside world. I see some things clearer than other people do because I have to simplify things to help me and that has helped others.”

Sir Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Group of companies, knighted for “services to entrepeneurship”, one of the richest men in the world.

CREATIVITY — THE PAYOFF

Now we come to the fun stuff — the stuff that dyslexics excel at.

While you’re in school, your teachers will help you learn to minimize the effects of your dyslexia when you are reading and spelling. When you get out of school, and get a job, you will have a calculator to quickly tell you what 4 X 15 is. You will have spell check for your documents. If you want to know when the first manned landing on the moon happened, you can look it up on the internet.

Nobody has yet invented a machine that has insights or an imagination — a machine that can think in pictures, and is creative. That’s anything-is-possible right-brain stuff. Right-brain thinkers see the world differently. Your outside-the-box vision leads you to new ideas.

There are a lot of characteristics that go into creativity. Creativity is a higher-level thinking skill that uses strengths such as:

Gist — Seeing the point of the problem

Pattern Recognition — Seeing what others don’t

Thinking in Pictures

Insight — Aha! moments when you suddenly understand the answer without going through logical steps to get there.

  • The region of the right hemisphere that dyslexics use to read is also where brilliant insights happen!
  • This means dyslexics might have more insights.

Imagination — Anything is possible!

Creativity is the payoff for different learning styles.

To create: to make or bring into existence something new.

Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary

LEARNING DIFFERENTLY

            You’ve gotten through the hard stuff. Now it is time to talk about what really sets dyslexics apart — your amazing ability to see the world differently. You don’t believe me? Read on.

  • Dyslexia is not the end of the world
  • Dyslexics think differently
    • Right brain thinking allows dyslexics to see the world in a new way
  • The other side of dyslexia is a set of awesome abilities.

            So now that you have an understanding of your dyslexia, it’s time to put your learning differences to work for you.

DYSLEXIA IS NOT THE END OF THE WORLD, IT IS THE BEGINNING OF THE ADVENTURE

            Dyslexic brains don’t want to shift from the big-picture right brain to the details-oriented left. Staying in the right hemisphere can cause problems for you when you read or do other jobs that need to be automatic.  

            But new research shows that the crossed-wires, fuzzy-processing, right-brain-use of dyslexics contributes to your thinking in unique, creative ways. That ability is very powerful,  and produces its own incredible talents.

DYSLEXICS THINK DIFFERENTLY FROM OTHER PEOPLE…

AND THAT’S A GOOD THING

            So what’s so great about how dyslexics think?

RIGHT BRAIN THINKERS

            You, as a dyslexic, don’t shift to the left side of your brain for reading. Instead, you use your right hemisphere more than non-dyslexics. 

            That means the right side of your brain gets more exercise. The right hemisphere is the “go-to” portion when you think about things. This is why dyslexics are big picture thinkers — you do most of your thinking in the big picture right side of your brain.   

            In fact, one of the few differences in dyslexic brains compared to those of fluent readers’ is that the right side of a fluent reader’s brain is slightly smaller than a dyslexic’s. 

“Studies show that individuals with dyslexia process information in a different area of the brain than do non-dyslexics.

Many people who are dyslexic are of average to above average intelligence.”

International Dyslexia Association http://www.interdys.org/FAQWhatIs.htm

LEFT BRAIN THINKER: HOW I THINK VERSUS HOW MY KIDS THINK

            I am a very linear thinker — I go from A to B to C without ever wandering off course. My kids are dyslexic. We have different ways of seeing the same problem.

            Consider the sentence: “There were bats in the old house, but they flew away.”

Two possible meanings of the word “bat” come up in my brain.

            When I read this sentence, I might pause to sort out if the writer meant a flying mammal or a stick for sports. But I’d go to my left hemisphere mental filing cabinet, where everything is stored logically, and based on context, I’d know pretty fast which meaning the author meant.

Bats

            Mammals

Live in abandoned buildings

Fly      

Wooden Sticks

May be left in abandoned buildings

Are swung and sometimes thrown

And I’d make a decision on which definition worked better. I wouldn’t spend any more time on the thought because I’d want to get on with the story I was reading.

The context of the sentence tells me which meaning of the word “bat” is appropriate.

But this is what might pop into my kids minds:

Everything that might possibly be associated with bats. And then associations with the associations.

            My way of reading lets me quickly understand the content and be fluent — I get sucked into whatever I’m reading. But my kids have a lot more interesting ideas flash through their heads.

            Neither way is better, just useful at different times. If you’re trying to read a story, getting sucked into a book makes it come alive. But if you’re trying to figure out why bats are getting a fatal disease, thinking of everything around the word “bat” may give you some great new connections.

“…I am interested less in the [dinosaur] bones per se than in what they reveal about large-scale trends.”

— Dr. John “Jack” Horner, paleontologist, MacArthur “genius” Fellowship recipient.

TAKE A NEGATIVE AND TURN IT INTO A POSITIVE

            Being fluent in something means that you have learned the script for it. Dyslexics, on the other hand, have a hard time remembering a lot of scripts.

            But dyslexics can turn this seeming-negative into a positive. Because you often have a hard time turning lots of little steps into scripts, you have to think about what you are doing each time you do it. And each time you do a step, you can ask yourself “Isn’t there a better way to do this?”  You think about what you are doing. Sometimes you come up with a better answer.

Doing it the hard way

I was working on the computer one day, using drop-down menus to individually copy and paste a lot of files from one place to the other. It was taking forever. My son wandered over and asked me “Why don’t you use Control-A to select them all at once, then drag them over?”

Past experience told me that I could get the job done by using my long series of scripts. I never stopped to ask myself if there wasn’t a better way to copy files — my scripts locked the knowledge up in only one way to do it. My dyslexic son saw many possibilities, including an easier one.

References

Armstrong, Thomas. 2003. “Coming to Grips with the Musculature of Words.” In The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive.
Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/102280/chapters/Coming-to-Grips-with-the-Musculature-of-Words.aspx.

Beilock, Sian. 2010. Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal about Getting It Right When You Have To. 1st Free Press hardcover ed. New York: Free Press.

Eide, Brock, and Fernette Eide. 2011. The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain. New York: Hudson Street Press.

Grandin, Temple, and Catherine Johnson. 2005. Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior. New York: Scribner.

Horner, John R. “Jack,” and Celeste Horner. 2004. “Jack Horner: An Intellectual Autobiography.” The Montana Professor, Spring 2004. http://mtprof.msun.edu/Spr2004/horner.html.

The International Dyslexia Association. “Promoting Literacy through Research, Education and Advocacy.” The International Dyslexia Association, November 12, 2001. http://www.interdys.org/FAQWhatIs.htm.

Nicolson, Rod, and Angela Fawcett. 2008. Dyslexia, Learning, and the Brain. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Shaywitz, Sally E. 2003. Overcoming Dyslexia: A New and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level. 1st ed. New York: Knopf.

Wolf, Maryanne. 2007. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. 1st ed. New York, N.Y.: Harper.

READING IS HARD WORK FOR DYSLEXICS

Dyslexic brains have trouble learning the correct scripts to connect sounds with written letters. You have problems storing the scripts in the left side of your brains as sight words. This gives you problems remembering the right words or breaking words down into their separate sounds.

You continue to sound the words out every time. To help sound out the words, dyslexic brains fire on both sides. You might even move your lips to use as much of your brain as possible to figure out the words, turning the letters back into sounds

Sounding out each word every time uses time and energy as lots of neurons in your brain fire inefficiently. The scripts are not very strong. It is a slow and tiring way to read.

Out of Time
We have, at most, two seconds to read a word and understand its meaning. If we don’t sound the word out in that time, we begin to forget it. Dyslexics often take a half second or more to sound a word out. If it is a hard word, it can take more than two seconds to decode. And so you begin to forget it.

Dyslexics use more time, and more of the right hemisphere of your brains to read a word. This means you burn more energy to read. And you might forget what you are reading as you sound it out.

Out of Energy
When really working on a problem, it is possible for anybody to literally run out of energy for higher-level thinking. People who are dyslexic work even harder than fluent readers to make letters make sense, and hold them in your brains long enough to understand the words. Because you have to work so hard at reading, your brain may use about five times more energy as fluent readers. Dyslexics work harder, and run out of energy faster and more often. This is why you may feel exhausted after a day at school.

Most people use about ten watts of energy to power their brain. When reading, dyslexics use five times more energy than fluent readers or 50 watts – about the same amount of energy as is needed to power a laptop computer!

To make reading automatic — to turn letters into a sight word — dyslexic readers have to see a word many more times than non-dyslexics do. But eventually, you being to recognize words without decoding them every time.

“Because of the dyslexia I always thought I had to work twice as hard as everyone else just to go the same distance.”

– Orlando Bloom, star of Lord of the Rings, Pirates of the Caribbean, and Blackhawk Down

For many dyslexics, reading may always be slow. It may never be fun. Writing may always have mistakes. Those are hard facts for you to deal with.

But dyslexics have other strengths.

References

Armstrong, Thomas. 2003. “Coming to Grips with the Musculature of Words.” In The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive.
Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/102280/chapters/Coming-to-Grips-with-the-Musculature-of-Words.aspx.

Beilock, Sian. 2010. Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal about Getting It Right When You Have To. 1st Free Press hardcover ed. New York: Free Press.

Bloom, Orlando. “Orlando Bloom.” Search Quotes. Accessed November 9, 2017a. http://www.searchquotes.com/quotation/Because_of_the_dyslexia_I_always_thought_I_had_to_work_twice_as_hard_as_everyone_else_just_to_go_the/340019/.

Eide, Brock, and Fernette Eide. 2011. The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain. New York: Hudson Street Press.

Nicolson, Rod, and Angela Fawcett. 2008. Dyslexia, Learning, and the Brain. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Shaywitz, Sally E. 1996. “Dyslexia.” Scientific American, 1996:98-104.

———. 2003. Overcoming Dyslexia: A New and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level. 1st ed. New York: Knopf.

“Dyslexic Kids’ Brains Work Harder.” 1999. University of Washington Alumni Magazine. Learning Curves. October 6, 1999. https://www.washington.edu/alumni/columns/dec99/dyslexia.html.

Wolf, Maryanne. 2007. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. 1st ed. New York, N.Y.: Harper.

Wood, Tracey. 2006. Overcoming Dyslexia for Dummies. – For Dummies. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Zimmer, Carl. 2006. “You’re a Dim Bulb (And I Mean That in the Best Possible Way).” The Loom. DISCOVER Magazine. March 23, 2006. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/loom/?p=359.

HOW WE LEARN TO READ

For most people learning to read is just like learning to do any other skill. Beginning readers:

            Left HemisphereRight Hemisphere
 1) see the letters and hear the sounds
 2) attach the sounds to the letters
3) practice putting sounds to groups of
letters as words
 
4) create scripts that tell them what
the words mean — turn them into sight
words.
 
Beginners practice a word until it is stored in the word app storage area (red, on left) for easy access. Dyslexia researchers call this the “word form area”.

Pretty soon, most people can skip the first two steps. When they practice enough to turn the words into sight words, the words are stored in the word app storage area. The beginning readers will have enough brain power left over to read fluently, and get sucked into the book.

Fluent readers go to the word app storage area (red, on left) to quickly retrieve a word when they are reading.

Dyslexics Don’t Switch to the Left Hemisphere

Dyslexics have a hard time storing the words they are learning in the word app storage area.

But because reading uses the sight system to interpret sounds, there are more chances for problems and confusion. Some people — people who are dyslexic — have a very hard time learning the scripts needed to read. Researchers think that dyslexia can be a problem with any of the areas of the brain used in reading, or the connections between them. That explains why dyslexia looks different in every person who has it.

One of the main problems is that dyslexics’ fast, efficient left-hemisphere has a hard time learning the scripts to recognize a word on sight. Your brains don’t switch from using the right side to sound the word out each time, to using just the expert left side where written-word scripts are stored. You have to sound the words out many more times before they become sight words. This process takes more time and more brain energy. It is a slow and tiring way to read.

So there is another characteristic that can be assigned to right or left brain hemispheres:

           Left HemisphereRight Hemisphere
 Fluent ReaderDyslexic Reader

“If you are dyslexic, your eyes work fine, your brain works fine, but there is a little short circuit in the wire that goes between the eye and the brain. Reading is not a fluid process.”

– Caitlyn Jenner, Olympic Gold Medalist

References

Armstrong, Thomas. 2003. “Coming to Grips with the Musculature of Words.” In The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive.
Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/102280/chapters/Coming-to-Grips-with-the-Musculature-of-Words.aspx.

Beilock, Sian. 2010. Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal about Getting It Right When You Have To. 1st Free Press hardcover ed. New York: Free Press.

Jenner, Caitlyn. n.d. “Caitlyn Jenner Quotes.” BrainyQuote. Accessed November 9, 2017a. https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/c/caitlynjen362264.html.

Nicolson, Rod, and Angela Fawcett. 2008. Dyslexia, Learning, and the Brain. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Shaywitz, Sally E. 2003. Overcoming Dyslexia: A New and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level. 1st ed. New York: Knopf.

Wood, Tracey. 2006. Overcoming Dyslexia for Dummies. – For Dummies. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Wolf, Maryanne. 2007. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. 1st ed. New York, N.Y.: Harper.

HOW WE LEARN — DETAILS

The different brain hemispheres have different jobs when we try to learn something new. As beginners, we start off using both sides of our brains, looking at everything we could possibly need to get the job done. By the time we’ve become an expert at the task, we are only using the parts we need, stored on the left side of our brain.

So to learn something new, our brain has to:

Left HemisphereRight Hemisphere
 1) take in a lot of new information
 2) see what the overall goal is
3) figure out what’s important 
4) then put the correct bits together to get the job done. 

We do this process over and over again. Each time we go through the process, we get better at remembering which bits are important and which bits we can ignore. The more we practice, the more often our brain neurons fire together, the stronger the connection, the better we get. This is why practice is so important in mastering a skill — we are teaching our brain neurons to fire together in the right pattern.

It’s like our brains create little apps that run when you want to do something. Psychologists call these scripts.

Experts Switch to Left

As the skill becomes automatic, our brains cut out the first two steps in the right hemisphere, then the third step, on the left. By the time the process is automatic, the brain just uses the bits needed by running the script in the left hemisphere.

With the bits that are important stuck together in the left side of our brains, the expert left hemisphere limits options or possibilities. Limited options means more time for details of other stuff.

Think of it this way: when you wanted to learn to text on a cell phone, you had to

            Left HemisphereRight Hemisphere
 1) see all your options
 2) figure out the best way to do it, then
3) put the steps in the correct order and 
4) practice until you got it right. 

At first, you weren’t very good. But you practiced the skills over and over again. It took a lot of time and effort. But now, when you want to text someone, you do it without thinking about it. Fast and efficient.

When you master the skill, the bundle of steps becomes one smooth action. You don’t have to think about each step every time. In fact, if you stop and think about a skill that you have mastered, it slows you down, and you make mistakes. Try thinking about every step of texting now, and you won’t get very far very fast.

Most of the things we do in life follow these scripts. Brushing your teeth, walking to gym class, riding a bike — all follow scripts.

Once we learn the scripts, our brains go to them first. We don’t think about the individual parts of the script, because it will mess us up.

The little brain apps work really well most of the time. And they leave the brain enough processing power to have a conversation with your friend as you text.

There’s a lot to learn out there. Schools are places where teachers try to get as many scripts as possible into their students memories. They are trying to teach you the scripts as quickly and efficiently as possible.

HOW WE LEARN — OVERVIEW

To understand what’s going on with dyslexia, we need to understand a little about how we learn to read. In this post, well look at:

A TALE OF TWO HEMISPHERES

The brain is divided into two halves, called the right and left hemispheres. The two sides of the brain are connected. They share information and work together.  You need both sides to function well.

DIFFERENT STRENGTHS, DIFFERENT JOBS

But the right and left hemispheres of the brain have different strengths. They process information in very different ways.  Think of it this way: the right brain looks at the whole big picture, the left brain works with a limited number of parts. 

Right Brain Jobs

The right brain is where we do our mental processing when we are just beginning to learn how to do a task. It works with huge amounts of information from all the senses. The right brain is slow and takes a lot of energy, but sees the big picture as it explores. For the right brain, anything is possible.

Think of designing an imaginary car. You would probably come up with a mix of what would the car have to have — some sort of engine to make it move, and what would just be really awesome — ejector seats!

Left Brain Jobs

The left brain is where expert processes are stored. It thinks in details, is logical, analytical and fast. To do this, the left brain limits possibilities.

Driving the car involves a lot of automatic rules. When you come to a four way stop, you always let the person to the right of you go first. Why? You are limiting your options so you can focus on watching for other cars and pedestrians.

MAIN BRAIN HEMISPHERE STRENGTHS

Some people are very good at using the skills and strengths of both sides of their brains. Others think more with one side or the other, either being more analytical, or being more intuitive. If you’re like most people, you’ll be strong in some areas and less so in others.

 It’s kinda like building a character in a role-playing game like Dungeons and Dragons. In a role-playing game, each character has different strengths — a twelve in magic. They also have challenges — a three in charisma.

Everybody has a mix of right and left brain strengths and weaknesses. What are your strengths from each side?

Left Hemisphere Strengths –  PartsRight Hemisphere Strengths – Whole
Right handed.Left handed.
Fast processing.Slow processing.
Focused on fine details.Looks at all the information.
Sorts ideas and objects.Identifies relationships,  similarities, likenesses,  and patterns. 
Takes the whole and breaks it up into its parts  – just uses what’s needed for the specific task.Makes connections; sees gist, background or context   as patterns in the whole. Needs the big picture.
Logical steps — builds on everything it knows up to now.Spatial abilities — the ability to understand how objects or ideas fit together. 
Recognizes incoming information and responds to the important stuff with short-cuts called scripts, instead of having to think everything through every time.Can handle independent streams of information from different senses flowing into our brains at the same time — the big picture.
Strings separate moments together in succession to give us a sense of time — important for putting words in the right order.Lets us remember isolated incidents amazingly well, everything happens in the here and now.
Sees precise descriptions.Sees ambiguities or inconsistencies — things that don’t fit together as a whole. This includes metaphors, jokes and inferences.
Understands the grammar of sentences, and the meaning of words and letters.Understands tone of voice, facial expressions, body language   and other social languages.  
Thinks in words.Thinks in pictures.
Limits possibilities to get faster responses.Sees possibilities, notices and explores.
Categorizes and organizes information and compares what is the best way to do things —  is very judgmental.Thinks outside the box, is very intuitive, spontaneous, imaginative and judgment-free — anything is possible.

Just like a roll-playing game, the mix of strengths that you get is as random as a roll of the dice.

References

Eide, Brock, and Fernette Eide. 2011. The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain. New York: Hudson Street Press.

Kounios, John. 2017. Per. Comm. “Re: Insights as Related to Dyslexia,” July 11, 2017.

Kounios, John, and Mark Beeman. 2009. “The Aha! Moment: The Cognitive Neuroscience of Insight.” Current Directions in Psychological Science 18 (4):210–16. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8721.2009.01638.x

Taylor, Jill Bolte. 2008. My Stroke of Insight : A Brain Scientist’s Personal Journey. New York: Viking.

Shaywitz, Sally E. 1996. “Dyslexia.” Scientific American, 1996:98-104.

———. 2003. Overcoming Dyslexia: A New and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level. 1st ed. New York: Knopf.

UW News. “Dyslexic Children Use Nearly Five Times the Brain Area.” Accessed March 5, 2019. http://www.washington.edu/news/1999/10/04/dyslexic-children-use-nearly-five-times-the-brain-area/.

Wolf, Maryanne. 2007. Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. 1st ed. New York, N.Y.: Harper.